08 November 2019

In art photography, the artisan can complement the photographer’s artwork in order to enhance the image. We will therefore explain to you the different types of framing options that will highlight and protect your art photography.

 

 

What is an ‘art photograph’?

The two parts that lead a photograph to the title of artwork are its’ rarity and authenticity. Photographs are easily copied due to their nature; it must therefore have a control mechanism on the number of editions or copies. In French law, according to a decree from 17th February 1995, an ‘art photograph’ must be sold as a limited edition of up to only 30 prints, in all sizes. The photos are accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

 

To embellish the photograph and make it a real ‘objet d’art’, we will explain to you different framing options available, that will best match your photographs.

 

- The aluminium lamination and frame

This refined first option is done in two stages: in the first stage, after the photograph has been printed on fine art paper, it is pressed onto a self-adhesive aluminium plate using a professional laminator, the roller applies a uniform pressure to the photograph sticking it onto the plate evenly.

 

Untitled I, Prism series - Matthieu Venot 

 

 

         Untitled I, Prism series - Matthieu Venot 

      

The second stage is to add an aluminium frame to the plate, producing a floating effect to the photograph once hung on the wall. On the back of the aluminium plate, a frame of varying thickness (as required) is glued which will alter the effect when hung. This is an elegant floating solution with an enhanced drop shadow effect when compared to other framing options.

 

 

Untitled I,Prism series - Matthieu Venot   

 

- The ‘classic’ frame

With this frame, lamination is required for a perfect finish. It also prevents the photograph from being damaged or curling, and it can be done onto a cardboard or aluminium plate. The photograph is placed onto a self-adhesive plate using a professional laminator, the roller applies a uniform pressure to photograph as it is pressed onto the plate.

The framer then makes the outer wooden frame that will surround the plate and photograph. The size of the wooden frame may vary, it can be thick or thin and will help protect the photograph.

 

Palm Cockatoo #3, Los-Angeles, CA, 2016 - Brad Wilson 

 

                                 

       Palm Cockatoo #3, Los-Angeles, CA, 2016 - Brad Wilson

 

   

       Palm Cockatoo #3, Los-Angeles, CA, 2016 - Brad Wilson

 

- The ‘classic’ anti-reflective glass frame

With this frame, lamination is required. The photograph is placed onto a self-adhesive plate using a professional laminator, the roller applies a uniform pressure to photograph as it is glued onto the plate. However, the frame also holds a sheet of glass on top of the photograph to protect it. It is important to use museum quality anti-reflective glass so as not to degrade the quality of the image.

In addition to the high quality glass, an aesthetic feature of this professional frame is the addition of a mount to surround the photograph. The mount is made from varying sized sheets of paper-based material, placed around the image. They are bevelled, assembled and sheathed adding depth to the framed photograph.

 

     

Mine Changing Room II - Gina Soden 

 

                       Mine Changing Room II - Gina Soden                          

                                                

The framer can add the mounts to the photographs, but these white margins can also be a part of the photographic artwork itself. As an example, Christophe Jacrot photographs below are printed with a white margin on the paper framing the image, it is also known as a mount.

 

 

 Snjör series, Christophe Jacrot

 

The Farm, Snjör series - Christophe Jacrot

 

- American box frame

In this framing option, the first stage is also lamination. The framer will add a frame to the aluminium plate. Similar to the aluminium frame option, a floating effect is created thanks to the distance between the photograph’s and frame’s edges.

 

             

160.07.11, Tribute to Modigliani Series - Klaus Kampert

 

 

      160.07.11, Tribute to Modigliani Series - Klaus Kampert

 

 

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